Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘indoor lighting’

Hanging chandelier

I don’t know if there is a fear of electricians out there right now, but there seems to be an increase in overhead lights that can be plugged in, instead of hard-wired to the ceiling. Of course, it is easier than wiring what you already have (and less expensive) and some homes don’t even have ceiling lights to begin with (which I am still not used to, and I don’t quite understand why they build them that way).

But, as much as I am all for quick and easy decorating, I wish these had been designed by real people, and not manufacturer’s grabbing onto a trend, throwing it into a factory, and spitting it out at the public.

Lighting a home isn’t just about being able to see; if it was, then we would all just have cheap lightbulbs hanging everywhere, or a constant supply of flashlights in our pocket. We want it to look good, and, from a design point it should somehow enhance the room, instead of looking like some temporary solution on our to-do list.

I love the idea of making decorating easy, but it is the execution and design of these lights that is wrong. They should come with instructions, and a lot more care, so that they really will look like the picture on the front of the box.
Let’s be honest, every single one I have seen lately is hanging from a wiggly cord, looped across the ceiling, and dangling awkwardly down the wall, like a really bad Andy Warhol exhibit.

So, in my effort to save you from the awful, fancy hanging lights, I have a few suggestions….

– Open the box before you buy it. If the cord is white, wrapped tight, and looks bent, don’t bother.
– If you know an electrician who can add a chain to it, and/or a thinner/clear cord, then go for it.
– Please don’t wrap the cord in fabric, but you can paint it if that makes you feel better.
– Consider where you are going to hang it, and how you will drape/hang/celebrate/disguise the cord.
– If the photograph shows just a chain, and no cord, they are fibbing. It still needs electricity.
– Most of them do look better draped (in a designery kind of way) instead of pulled taut (like a bad facelift).

 

Wendy E. Wrzos http://wendyandthebluegiraffe.blogspot.com

(Photograph was from Amazon, but now it has disappeared…)

Read Full Post »

rodney smith

I don’t understand why we have ugly lampshades in this world. Does it really cost more to make a nice one?

Considering many homes don’t have ceiling lights, table and floor lamps are often a necessity, not just a pretty thing that helps you read the newspaper, or see what you’re having for dinner.

Funny thing is, when you buy a new lamp, there are thousands of perfectly lovely shades just sitting and waiting to be bought; almost touching your elbow, and taunting you for just $39.95 plus tax. And, you can’t swap them out (I have tried) because they now have little plastic tabs attached, making sure that you don’t accidentally lose the ugly shade that is sadly clinging to your new lamp.

It’s a shame, because lampshades are an easy way to change up a room, and it is a complete waste of money to buy another one before the plastic has even been taken off the first (you do remove the plastic, don’t you?). And, let’s be honest, as busy as most people are, shade shopping is not usually high on the “To Do” list.

So, if I was Queen, I would decree that all lamp stands and shades must be sold separately. That way, we could choose whatever we wanted, it would save us a lot of time (and money) and our rooms would be very grateful.

Until then, try to have fun with your shade; find ones that you really like, play with different shapes, consider decorating the boring ones, and splurge on an extra one when you can.

Wendy E. Wrzos http://wendyandthebluegiraffe.blogspot.com/

(p.s. The absolutely delightful photograph above, is by Rodney Smith, and I loved it so much I just thought it deserved to be bigger than my post).

Read Full Post »