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The Memory Dance

shadow dance

I was watching the Rachel Ray show the other day, where uber Organizer, Peter Walsh, was talking to Regis Philbin about how to declutter his memorabilia room. Regis, a collector and a celebrity, is the recipient of so many awards and accolades, and had an entire room filled with wonderful memories; everything from autographed football helmets to vintage posters and designer clothing. But, for all his celebrity status, he was just like us, and his biggest fear was that Peter was going to see it as “too much stuff”, and tell him to get rid of it.

But he didn’t, because it wasn’t about value, or taking up too much space, it was about memories, and I loved seeing the relief on Regis’ face when he was told that everything could stay (but it just needed to be a little more organized). Nothing was going to be thrown away.

This was Peter’s philosophy…

I have paraphrased what he said, but Peter is right; if something is that important (or sentimental) that you want to keep it, then give it meaning, and put it away safely, or display it well, and, most importantly, have it accessible…… Be able to find it. If you can’t find it, or see it, is it really that important?

Watching the show reminded me that I will always be a sentimental clutterer, and I don’t have to force myself to live in a spartan house or get rid of things that seem too old, all I have to do is honor my memories, visit them often, and use them to feed and nourish my happiness …

Wendy E. Wrzos

http://wendyandthebluegiraffe.blogspot.com/

Photograph from: Poems about Dance

Stairs - spiral from Morgue

You know that I cringe at rules,
but now and again we all want a simple answer
to something that we can’t quite figure out.
We want to know what the magic is, what other people have,
and how we can get it before we have to run off and do something else.
I do it myself,
and in a mad moment I will find myself googling the most ridiculous of things.
So, in answer to what I got asked twice this last week,
here are seven things that I think every room needs.

SOMETHING BLACK

A room can’t breathe without a touch of something inky dark.
 It doesn’t have to be much,
but a smudge of black here and there (even a squiggle on a pillow)
will add something that is almost inexplicable but so necessary.

CURVES

Nature rarely does straight lines.
Organic curves and shapes will bring warmth, life,
and a natural, reassuring comfort to your home.

HISTORY

Something from the past.
Whether it is an old photograph, a vintage piece of furniture,
or a beloved book from your childhood,
it will always invite a question and a story.

A FAVORITE THING

Represent yourself in a very personal way.
Old or new, you must have something that you absolutely love,
beyond a shadow of a doubt, in every single room.

SHELVES

You don’t even need to own a book.
Shelves will instantly add interest to your room,
while organizing your endless collection of bits and bobs
into a neat, confined little rectangle.

BEAUTY

We are a fickle bunch, and we like to look at pretty things.
But we don’t need a designer.
If it makes you happy, and you like the way it looks,
then it will be beautiful to you.

GREEN

Every home should have some.
It feels calming, balanced, and energizing all at the same time.
For moments of green without commitment,
grow a plant, use apple scented shampoo,
draw a picture with a green crayon,
and spend at least fifteen minutes wondering why people eat artichokes.

During one of my last classes, we started to talk about social media. Students wanted to know just how important is it? Which ones should they contribute to? Who should they follow? What about likes, posting, blogging….and on and on it went. 

After giving them my stock answer (follow your demographic, choose the ones you like, and don’t think you need to do it all), it got me thinking about my own social media experiences. Some of my accounts are strictly for business, while others are for pleasure. And then some of them actually cross over. I prefer FB to Twitter. I enjoy the visual, so Pinterest and Instagram are favorites. And even though I don’t really care for either, I’m told I must be on LinkedIn and Google+, so I am.

After taking a look at my web presence, and social media in general, I was a bit shocked at what I found. Because I spend a decent amount of time on FB and Pinterest, I expected a certain number of followers or likes and I’m right where I thought I should be. On the other hand, I really like Instagram, but I don’t post very often, so I guess the numbers are okay. Then there’s LinkedIn (I’m okay), Twitter (not as big as I thought), and finally Google+. That was the biggest shocker of them all. I repost my blog posts to several outlets, including Google+, but that’s about it. Yet I have had over 5 million page views! Yes, 5 million. What? Why? How? (That’s the 5 million dollar question.)

On Pinterest, I’ll repin something I love and get no response, while several of my pins have more than 3000 repins. Go figure. It’s the same with this blog—not a peep for weeks and then I’ll get lots of comments. Or I’ll get emails instead of comments. And it’s usually never on the posts that I really took extra care with. 

What I’ve concluded is that the numbers really don’t add up. So if you’re worried about followers, likes, comments, and the rest. Don’t be. My stats tell me my blog is doing well, regardless if people comment or not. Who has time to comment these days? I certainly don’t. So why should I expect anyone else to. I know I’m reaching my readers because they email me, contact me on social media, and some have even called me! So take heart. Your hard work is paying off more than you think it is. 

The Pinterest pins above are from these posts (or pins) and range anywhere from 80 to 3300 repins. Go figure. (Color pin, small spaces, quote, color pin)

Take A Picture

fox and camera

My phone is not very smart, and I still have to open it up like an old-fashioned, mirrored compact; it isn’t in a hurry, can take several hours to get a message, and when it finally arrives it will have been jumbled into neat little piles of 140 characters or less.

I know I am holding onto it a little too tightly; resisting change, and dreading the time when checking my email might become more important than noticing a flower, or driving my car in a straight line.

But, I can barely see the screen, it no long likes to type the letter m or b, and it doesn’t take photographs anymore. Well, it does, but they are the size of a postage stamp, and by the time I have squinted enough to see what I am doing, it has gone back to some random setting and politely asks me if I want to send a message. Some days, I am not sure who is more confused.

And, I need photographs. Whether it is stored in a cloud (don’t ask me, I don’t even know what that means either) or in a basket on my dining room table (much better) I need memories and art in my everyday life.

They are also one of my favorite things to use in decorating. It is so hard to be objective about our own space that taking a photograph will instantly help you to see what others see. Like they say, the camera doesn’t lie; it might add on ten pounds, but it’s okay if your sofa and chair are looking a little plump that week.

A photograph gives you time to sit and look at what you truly have. It’s a captured moment of your life, and even though you walk through your home a dozen times a day, it is a rare person who will actually notice what is there.

If you’re selling your home, it is also the absolute best way to see your house from a buyer’s perspective. Try to imagine that you are the Realtor, and take photographs from across the street and all throughout your home. Be honest, or show a friend, and ask yourself how it really looks. Let these photographs be a reference, and use them for making a few changes, and tidying up a little before you put your home on the market.

The same goes for decorating your home. If you feel stuck, and don’t know what it is about a room that you don’t like, or you do but don’t know how to fix it, take a photograph. You will be amazed at how different your home looks through a lens (it’s a little like buying skinny jeans with your eyes closed, then coming home and realizing that the view from behind could traumatize small children).

Ironically, to be able to take photographs is probably the only reason that would push me to get a new phone, which is kind of funny, because then I think the obvious solution would be to actually buy a camera….

Wendy E. Wrzos http://wendyandthebluegiraffe.blogspot.com/

Photograph from: http://animalsandcameras.tumblr.com/post/35827073793

A Change of Plans

dandelion dreamanityOver ten years ago we had a sun-room added to the back of our house. I was lucky enough to be able to design it, and it instantly became my most favorite room. Whether it was pouring with rain, covered in snow, or just too hot to think, I could sit in that room and the world instantly became a better place. With windows all around and skylights up above, it was a small piece of paradise leading from my back door.

Then, one day, the air hockey table arrived, and my dream was gone. No matter how much I decorated around it, I could still see it; it ruined my view, and the flowered tablecloth looked so uncomfortable with the intrusion of the noisy, plastic, over-sized toy. I briefly considered moving it into the dining room, but in reality the logistics of eating at an air hockey table were a bit odd, so I wondered if I could put a plant on it, or disguise it with some books and a blanket.

After a while I gave up, and accepted the room with the new addition, but I didn’t like it, and what had seemed cozy and eclectic, now seemed cluttered and dismal. I liked to play air hockey, but curling up with a book was never quite the same when I had to stare at the sea of plastic, and check for flying discs before I walked in the room.

So, I did the crazy thing that some of us do; I moved everything around and around, like a ridiculous Rubik’s cube that I couldn’t solve, refusing to accept the 4 foot by 8 foot toy that took up half of the room. I was reluctant to take anything out, because it was my room, and I knew from the beginning how I had wanted it to look.

But whatever I did didn’t make it look better, so I gave the room over to the cat and the dog. I gave up because I was annoyed, stuck in denial, and letting go of my idyllic room was still not on my agenda. Now and again I would walk in, frown, and leave, until this past week.

During the Winter I had decided to store the wood for the stove in the entrance of the sun-room. (A well learned lesson from the previous year, when we got wood delivered, threw a tarpaulin over it, and promptly had a snow and ice storm. The next day we lost power, so you would have seen us standing on the ice, chipping away with shovels until one of us (me) fell through the wood pile and gashed her leg open). Anyway, bringing the wood inside before the snow meant that we always had wood for the fire, and no-one got damaged in the process.

So, last week I was stacking the leftover wood into neat piles, frowning at the sun-room, when I finally realized that it was just too crowded, and the air hockey table wasn’t going anywhere anytime soon. I needed to let go of my old ideas, and I knew I could make it just as nice if I tweaked it a bit.

As soon as I took out a few pieces of furniture it all started to make sense; I had been so stuck in my own head that I couldn’t see the reality through the fog and clutter of my own thoughts. It’s funny, because it was so easy to change, and took no time at all, but I had become so emotionally invested in that room that I felt like I had been told to give up something important. My stubbornness had actually stopped me from adjusting and enjoying the room.

Now, I am happy to spend time in my sun-room, and while it is different than before, the differences have merged, and it has become a usable, lovable space again.

Wendy E. Wrzos http://wendyandthebluegiraffe.blogspot.com/

Photograph from: Dreamanity

decorating style
Sometimes, we don’t know what we like until we like it, but, if we don’t know what we like, then how do we know what we like?

We are all indecisive (and decisive) in different areas of our life. It’s a strength that I have with decorating, but am woefully lacking in almost every other department. Ask me what I want to eat at a diner, and I will always choose one of three things; the choice is overwhelming, and asking me to decide from more than two hundred items on a menu will have me quickly ordering the grilled cheese before you have even turned the page.

Finding our decorating style is a bit like reading the diner menu; we can’t decide, then, when we finally do, we wish we had what the other person was having. But, if we had just ordered what we wanted instinctively, without too much thought, we might really like our choice, and we probably wouldn’t be drooling over the other person’s spanakopita (well, we might, but I am sure if we asked nicely they would share a piece with us).

So, if you’re not sure what your decorating style is (and, like me, diner menu’s make you close your eyes and order the grilled cheese) here is a great little quiz from Houzz that might just help. Unfortunately, you do have to make a few decisions here as well, but I promise you, it isn’t hard at all, and no-one is holding a pen and a notepad over your head waiting for you to finish.

Honestly, I was going to make up my own quiz, but I found this, and it seemed pretty fun and accurate when I took it (it labeled my style as Eclectic), so I thought you might enjoy taking it too.

Just click on the picture at the top, and it will take you right there.

Wendy E. Wrzos http://wendyandthebluegiraffe.blogspot.com/

cabinet of curiositiesDid you know that most people will peek into your bathroom medicine cabinet? Apparently, in a survey by someone, more than 75% of people have opened up someone else’s cabinet just to see what is in there.

This has never occurred to me, until I was recently talking to someone and she started complaining about the messy state of a friend’s bathroom cabinet. As I listened to her, I was taken aback by what she had discovered in what seemed like just a few minutes. When she paused to take a breath, I asked her why she had opened it in the first place, and she replied, “I always look in them, don’t you?”

No, I don’t. Because really, I don’t want to know what’s in there, and, silly me, I always assumed it was private (it took me years before I would even look for a spare toilet roll in my best friend’s home). But, I have to admit, that shortly after our talk I did go through all of my cabinets and drawers; unbeknownst to her, she had single-handedly shattered my naive view of snooping, and I will probably never invite her over for a cup of tea on a Sunday afternoon.

People are curious, and whether it is a casual party, or a formal Open House, you should be prepared for unwelcome eyes. I could suggest a trip wire, or a small alarm attached to your medicine cabinet, but that might be a little extreme (and embarrassing for everyone concerned – but funny. A bit like that additive that is supposed to turn blue when you go to the toilet in someone’s pool. We’re not sure if it really exists, but who wants to take the chance?)

Anyway, it’s impossible to hide everything, but a few containers, and a little bit of organization, will probably make you feel better and distract the people who can’t resist; wouldn’t you rather have them marvel at your neatness than share all of your ailments over the next cup of morning coffee?
So, if you want to divert the curious, here are some quick ways to tidy up your medicine cabinet, and keep the gossip at bay…

  • Consider using your medicine cabinet only for things that you need every day.
  • Adjust the shelf heights (if possible) for more space and flexibility.
  • Clean it out. Toss any duplicates or expired items, and take out things that are too big, too personal, or rarely used.
  • Store prescription bottles in a closed container that can be easily lifted in and out.
  • Put generic items in small containers, drinking glasses, tea-cups, decorative tins or jars. This keeps everything neat, more visible, and will save you so much time and space. If you are worried about things breaking, buy acrylic containers.
  • Separate items according to whom they belong to.
  • Keep similar things together (e.g. toothpaste, toothbrush and floss).
  • If you want, you could even line the shelves with decorative paper.
  • Add a picture, decal, chalkboard, or a funny cartoon to the inside of the door.

Wendy E. Wrzos http://wendyandthebluegiraffe.blogspot.com/

Lovely photograph of real cabinet of curiosities is from Homelife Insideout.

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